Dance Floor Destructor

Erika:
n. 1. A tall woman with acerbic wit and Arcade Fire fanatic. Prone to short, temperamental/emotional outbursts and politically charged diatribes.
2. Informal: A pouting, pierced & dyed femme. Big smiles, beautiful brown eyes, and an excess of RED LIPSTICK.
3. Slang: A woman unafraid of being herself. For the most part.
Synonyms: woman, intelligent, discontent, FUNNY, affectionate, moody, girly, abnormal, tall, pierced, unique, lovely, emotional, sappy, passionate, silly, happy, elated, insomniac, friendly, fidgety, clumsy, geeky, nerdy, awesome.
Distinguishing Characteristics: (faux) violet eyes, glossy, red lips, big holes through her earlobes, romantic eyes, crayola colored eyeshadow, ridiculously child-like giggle, RETRO.
joystickhero:

If you don’t think these guys are hot, we can’t be friends.

joystickhero:

If you don’t think these guys are hot, we can’t be friends.

kenobi-wan-obi:

New tattoo: subatomic particles photographed colliding.

Referenced Image: Computer enhanced photo of sub-atomic particle collision in a linear accelerator’s ‘bubble chamber’.

Why I got it: It’s a part of my wrist tattoo of the Fibonnaci spiral that extends over to the rest of my arm of examples where the Fibonnaci spiral seems to appear. Examples of the intricate beauty and mysterious patterns that reoccur in nature, be it tiny subatomic particles colliding, little sea shells washing up on the shore, or massive galaxies at work, it’s a pattern that appears every where you look in nature.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

I seriously wish some of you didn’t live so goddamn far away. I need a friends night out or I need to make friends locally or I need to do something because this isn’t working.

Run on sentence, I know.

youngblackandvegan:

lascasartoris:


Competitors for the Carnival Queen title rehearsing at Holborn Hall, Gray’s Inn Road, London. 
The first Caribbean Carnival  (the precursor to Notting Hill Carnival) was held in St Pancras Town Hall in January 1959.

Contenders for the role of Carnival Queen rehearsing for the first Caribbean Carnival, London, January 1959. Photographer Chris Ware.
Faye Craig was crowned “Carnival Queen” and won a trip to carnival in Trinidad the following year. 
There were 12 contestants, all from the UK’s West Indian community - 6 Jamaicans, 6 Trinidadians, 1 from British Guiana and 1 Vincentian.  From left to right, Fay Craig, Faye Sparkes, Charmain Ourre, Shirley Robinson, June Allison Bailey, Beryl Cunningham, Ronia Richards, Carlita Callymore, Monica Dwyer and Terez Wiggins.
The beauty contest was championed by Claudia Jones, a leading Black political activist, founder and editor of the West Indian Gazette, and ‘Mother of Notting Hill Carnival’. Claudia Jones was also a supporter of beauty and hairdressing salons run by West Indian women and insisted that the West India Gazette carry beauty tips as way to communicate to a female audience the goals of Black self-realisation and valuing Black women’s beauty.
"this was before the Black Power Days. This was well before we all knew that we were beautiful. We might not have know it, but she knew, and she started this beauty contest." - Corinne Skinner Carter

glory

youngblackandvegan:

lascasartoris:

Competitors for the Carnival Queen title rehearsing at Holborn Hall, Gray’s Inn Road, London.

The first Caribbean Carnival  (the precursor to Notting Hill Carnival) was held in St Pancras Town Hall in January 1959.

Contenders for the role of Carnival Queen rehearsing for the first Caribbean Carnival, London, January 1959. Photographer Chris Ware.

Faye Craig was crowned “Carnival Queen” and won a trip to carnival in Trinidad the following year. 

There were 12 contestants, all from the UK’s West Indian community - 6 Jamaicans, 6 Trinidadians, 1 from British Guiana and 1 Vincentian.  From left to right, Fay Craig, Faye Sparkes, Charmain Ourre, Shirley Robinson, June Allison Bailey, Beryl Cunningham, Ronia Richards, Carlita Callymore, Monica Dwyer and Terez Wiggins.

The beauty contest was championed by Claudia Jones, a leading Black political activist, founder and editor of the West Indian Gazette, and ‘Mother of Notting Hill Carnival’. Claudia Jones was also a supporter of beauty and hairdressing salons run by West Indian women and insisted that the West India Gazette carry beauty tips as way to communicate to a female audience the goals of Black self-realisation and valuing Black women’s beauty.

"this was before the Black Power Days. This was well before we all knew that we were beautiful. We might not have know it, but she knew, and she started this beauty contest." - Corinne Skinner Carter

glory

(Source: spiritsdancinginthenight, via redvelvetlola)